Nepřístupný dokument, nutné přihlášení
Input:

Company structure and personnel

11.8.2018, , Zdroj: Verlag Dashöfer

2001
Company structure and personnel

Edward Thomas

1. COMPANY STRUCTURE

Look at the table below. It describes the meaning of basic words used to describe different structures of businesses. Unfortunately they are mixed up, and need to be correctly linked. Can you manage it?


1) Found a) One person organising his/her own company
2) Wind up b) Where shares are bought and sold
3) Shares/stocks c) How much a person or people could lose if a company fails
4) Stock exchange d) Where the losses of a company are mainly limited to falls in the value of its shares
5) Partnership e) To end a company (liquidate)
6) Sole proprietorship f) Where the members of a business can lose only a limited amount
7) Liability g) Parts of a company for sale to people who afterwards get a part of the company's profit
8) Limited company (ltd) i) To start a company
9) Public limited company (plc) j) Whether the company has enough money to operate or not
10) Solvent/insolvent k) Two or more people who own a company together

Correct answers are here1

Look at the table below. There you can see two very important words for businesses that are basic opposites (antonyms). Can you add the missing forms of the words? Some of the forms may be frequently used, others more unusual.

Can you find another antonym of the personal noun „loser”2?

What common verb do we use with the two abstract nouns from the table?

Verb Personal noun Abstract noun Adjective
profit                                                                                        
                                  loser                                                                   

Correct answers are here3

2. BRANCHING OUT

Look at the text below which shows the progress of a company. Can you put the paragraphs into the correct order?

„So, this is how it was...

1) Because I had a lot of contacts I didn't have any problems in finding customers for my services- I went into companies and gave courses to the staff there. I also began to look for people to do jobs for some of these companies- that's how I started with recruitment, and that's when I met David and we formed a partnership to share the profits and the liabilities. David was a specialist in recruitment, while I was able to advise and train the people we recruited.

2) It began way back in the early 90's with just myself. I had worked for a big multinational and now I was ready to do something on my own. I became a sole proprietor of a small business training people in sales techniques. It was great fun organising my own schedule, my own offices, and so on- not so much fun organising my own tax forms and thinking about the liabilities I had if the business failed and I was left with a lot of debts.

3) By this time, the mid-2000s, we were employing 35 people in total. It was then that we were approached by- remarkably- the same multinational that I had originally worked for! They wanted to take over the company and invest a lot of money, and David and I would be the managers of this new company, which would be their subsidiary.

4) So here I am again, working for a public limited company which is listed on the London Stock Exchange. The great thing is I don't have to worry personally about the company's possible losses- the bad part is I only get a small part of the profits.

5) The company we had founded grew very quickly. We even began selling some specialised products direct to purchasing departments. After a while we needed to get some extra capital to develop the business- that's when we re-formed the company as a limited company. We got new investors, some of whom became members of a board of directors which met regularly to discuss the progress the company was making- suggesting ways to increase our profits, for example. Of course, for their investments they got a part of the profits, so they were very interested in our success!

Correct answers are here4

3. SHOOTING UP

Read through the following history of Man Group plc. Can you fill the gaps with the right vocabulary from the box below.


 
plc trader trade partner
subsidiary founded partners takeover
stock exchange stock exchanges shares

The Rise of Man

Man Group plc is one of Britain´s most successful and oldest companies. It was 1. …………………………… by James Man in 1783 and recently celebrated its 225th anniversary. But it has changed a lot over the years. It began as a trading company of rum and sugar, and later expanded into coffee and cocoa through a process of diversification. As 2. …………………………… …………………………… grew Man added to its commodity 3. …………………………… as it became a financial 4. …………………………… as well- a broker acting between buyers and sellers.

By 1956 there were seven 5. …………………………… to share in the business, and 38 staff.

The development of financial instruments in the 1970's created new possibilities for Man Group.

In 1983 Man became a 6. …………………………… with a money management firm and began to get its modern form as an investment company. At that time it had 650 staff.

Over the next 15 years big changes happened:

AHL became a wholly owned 7. …………………………… of Man, which in that way became a parent company.

Man became a UK 8. ……………………………… and it offered 9. …………………………… to the public for the first time (an IPO or Initial Public Offering) at GBP1.80. At that time, 1994, it had 3000 staff.

Man grew through the acquisition (ie. 10. ……………………………) of Funder Funds, Glenwood and RMF.

Man's commodity activities were demerged. This meant that Man Group became focussed only on financial products.

Its broker business was floated on the New York 11. …………………………… …………………………….

Over the last ten years Man's market capitalisation has grown to about $20billion and its number of employees to just under 5000.

It has become a leading player in the global hedge funds business.

Hedge funds have become a $2 trillion business.

Correct answers are here5

4. MEET THE BOARD (OF A PHARMACEUTICAL COMPANY)

„I'm Martin Colville, the CEO or Chief Executive Officer. I am meant to ensure 1. ……………………………. Sometimes I get called the Chairman of the Board.”

„Hi. I'm George Mc Cann. I'm the C.O.O., or Chief Operating Officer. I report to Martin and 2. ……………………………. I'm really needed because the company is too large for the CEO to manage everything.”

„I'm Will Blondquist. I am the C.F.O., or Chief Financial Officer. My job has several parts- to manage financial risk for the company, 3. ……………………………. I oversee in-company auditing and the preparation of financial reports. I report to the Board and the CEO.”

„Hi, I'm William Ekwulugo. I am our Executive Vice-President, Africa. With all the medical problems in Africa it's a major region for growth in the drugs business and 4. …………………………… is very important.”

„I'm Alston Hughes. I am 5. ……………………………. I am responsible for the licensing and branding of our products, as well as research.”

„I'm Alison Howarth. I'm a Non-Executive Director. I sit on both the Nomination Committee and the Remuneration Committee. 6. …………………………… and I help decide who will become a Board member and how much people in the company will get paid- from the lowest workers to to the top of management...”

„...And my name is Rob Howell and I'm also an Outside Director- I sit on the Science Committee because 7. …………………………… for deciding what kind of products to select for development and research.”

Above you can see the descriptions of some of the board members of a Pharmaceutical company.

Below you can see some phrases that have been taken from the descriptions, leaving gaps. Can you put the right phrases in the right gaps?

a) this division of our company

b) Executive Director for Development

c) that all the decisions of the Board are carried out

e) I have a background in personnel and finance

f) I manage the day to day affairs of the company

g) my experience in medicine is vital

h) to do financial planning, and financial record keeping

Correct answers are here6

5. FAT CATS' PAY CAUSES ANGER ;-)

The fat cats of the boardroom are earning great amounts of money when their salaries are combined with share option schemes and bonuses. This is despite the credit crisis and companies making large losses. The survey by the Interesting-to-Know (I.K.) survey group showed that total incomes for directors of Britain's top companies continued to rise even though companies were making less money, and that public relations companies were being employed to make the bosses' salaries look reasonable.

The biggest salaries it suggests are in financial services, although these organisations have been hardest hit by the first stages of recession and in many cases have made employees redundant. At the same time, they have continued to offer bonuses to senior management members. They claim that to get talented staff at top levels companies have to continue to offer bonuses.

The biggest pay gaps between top and bottom can be seen supermarkets and pubs. This may be because they employ a large number of part-time workers.

The detailed results of the survey are likely to cause angry debates over executive pay. 'It seems incredible that top directors consider themselves so much more productive than the rest of their staff,' a Mr Whatnot told the Inquisition newspaper, ”it also seems that success is rewarded but there is no penalty for failure“.

Polly Complainer led a long line of newspaper commentators attacking the

 
 Napište nám
 Beru na vědomí, že tento formulář neslouží pro zadávání odborných dotazů, ale pro zasílání Vašich podnětů a postřehů k fungování portálu. Pro zadávání odborných dotazů prosím používejte tento formulář. Děkujeme za pochopení.
 Děkujeme, na Váš podnět budeme reagovat do 24 hodin v rámci pracovního týdne.
Input: